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I would like to install a radiator fan switch on my dash but want it wired basically as an over ride switch so that if it is flipped on the fan runs and if it is flipped off then the fan works normally as if from the factory. Anyone know how to do this?
 

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Hmmm now that I really cannot answer, let me do some research and see if I can find something for you.
 

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I agree with Rutcutter, just short the fan thermal switch on the radiator with a switch.

I kind of liked the idea of wiring the temp warning light to come on when your fan was on. If it comes on, you know its working, if it stays on, there is something wrong cause its not cooling.
 

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Use a single pole double throw switch:

L1----O
O---- Common
L2----O

Pull white wire off of radiator breaker and connect to L1. Crimp another wire onto blue wire connector of radiator fan switch and connect to L2. Common would be connected to white wire (12V) out of the radiator fuse (spliced between fuse and breaker). So when switch is up, circuit is "normal"; when down, you've jumped across the temp switch and apply 12V to the fan (fan on). This keeps all your fuses and breakers functional for safety.
 

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Use a single pole double throw switch:

L1----O
O---- Common
L2----O

Pull white wire off of radiator breaker and connect to L1. Crimp another wire onto blue wire connector of radiator fan switch and connect to L2. Common would be connected to white wire (12V) out of the radiator fuse (spliced between fuse and breaker). So when switch is up, circuit is "normal"; when down, you've jumped across the temp switch and apply 12V to the fan (fan on). This keeps all your fuses and breakers functional for safety.
I'd say do exactly that, but instead of wiring to the fan switch, you might consider going straight to the relay. Then you'd get all the benifits of the above, plus the added advantage of switch failure not crippling your fan switch circuit. Switch failures aren't very common (but not exactly rare, either), but if it does, your system will operate normally. You'd only need a single pole/single throw switch, as well.
 
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