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I was wondering of anyone has tried running without the front swaybar hooked up. I realize that the sand riders and racers need the lateral support for high speeds, but for slow moving, rockcrawling, or woods riding. The ride would be smoother and I believe that you gain almost 4" more travel. Some one should come up with a Quick-disconnect system like the Jeep guys have.
 

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That is a great idea. After crawling some rocks this weekend a quick disconnect would have been cool.
 

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I understand disconnecting the sway bar for playing in the rocks because it will allow the front suspension to move more independently but, how does a sway bar limit wheel travel? (& by 4"? Yikes!) And if the sway bar truly does limit wheel travel, then that's a horrible design by Kawasaki.
 

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Sway bar

Well it doesn't actually change the amount of travel available it just limits the travel by forcing the other side of the suspension to work as well. It is great for stability but hurts in total articulation.

I'm not sure I would run my bar completely disconnected but it may be a good product to make it adjustable so you could soften or stiffen the effect of the sway bar. In effect tuning it to your use preference.

That's my 2 cents.
 

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Slow crawling over rocks I would not have a problem running with the sway bar disconnected, however, anything above that I would not run without it connected. If you do decide to drive with it disconnected, be very careful.

With that said, a quick disconnect or some sort of adjustable, may be a pretty cool idea!
 

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Sway BAR or..?

So I got my ride with stock tires and a 2" specers and I noticed that doing some power slides that my ride feels like its going to tip over. I have rolled it 2 times already ..all after I upgraged to 4 seats and cage..! So The question is Do I add the Additonal sway bar or just get offset tires to give me some more width ? I know that Suspention upgrade would be ideal but i dont have 5K right now.
 

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wow, funny to see this thread pop up. After we were riding yesterday, we were talking about doing a quick disconnect on the sway bars. Anybody do anything in this department?
 

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The ITI Swaybars are a beautiful well thought out product for sure. BUT, I myself am an anti swaybar person. Swaybars restrict the suspension from working independently. You do get alot more body roll without them hooked up, but you gain a lot of traction and articulation. IMO,If Yamaha would have removed the swaybar or not had one they wouldn't have had the lawsuits they have from the rollovers. Disconnecting the swaybar on a Rhino nearly eliminates the rollover on a stock Rhino. Why you ask, well the sway bar makes the suspension too rigid laterally. Instead of the the weight trying to roll over a solid point being the tire and lifting the inside tire with the swaybar attached. With it detached the suspension can absorb the weight transfer and the inside tire remains in contact with the ground thus more traction. In cross grain terrain, that side to side shaking disappears withthe sway bar disconnected.

It just takes an adjustment in driving style. Instead of driving in a corner on the gas and sliding sideways thru and out, you drive in deeper roll into the corner and roll on the gas center out, other wise with the added traction you will find you push. The secret is patience and feel. When are patient you can feel the completion of the weight transfer onto the outside suspension then roll on the throttle to transfer the weight onto the outside rear then mash the gas and you launch out of the corners. Believe me learn to drive that way and your total corner time will be quicker from entry to exit. I say experiment for your self, but as D.P. said be careful!!!! And make sure to adjust your driving style.
 

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I have the ITI on front and rear on my rhino and when I drove a stock rhino on the cross country course it got on two wheels so easily and mine didn't. As a matter of fact it handles so good I passed eight RZR's and took second place in the race and a lot had to do with handling.

There is a difference in sway bars though. The stock stuff is just a rigid bar that has no pound rating and the bars from ITI are a torsion style.

I get a better ride in the rough stuff due to both shocks taking the load from a impact on one side.
 

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I forgot to mention that the body roll feel is certainly not what some can enjoy or adapt their driving style to. Then with all means look into adding the ITI rear setup at least it will be a huge improvement over stock. They have different bars from soft to stiff. Talk to Frank ITI and he'll dial you in.
 

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I always thought the rear bar looked massive for a 1,300 pound vehicle. Tell me it isn't solid, please. IMHO properly rated sway bars should be a huge improvement.

However, more isn't better. To illustrate the point, imagine if the bar was so strong it couldn't twist. If a rock lifts one wheel, it would lift the other. The impact would be the same as if each wheel went over the same size rock. The brute forces being transmitted through the frame from the suspensions on each side to the other will probably crack the frame over time. The suspension is supposed to protect the frame from such forces, not transmit them. If you are trying to get through a curve where there is rough terrain, whatever advantages you might get from less body roll would be far outweighed by the loss of traction from one wheel trying to yank the other off the ground.

A rigid bar would also have strange effects when cornering smooth terrain or on a road surface. There would be no body roll. It would seem like the vehicle was impervious to rolling over. But when it's limits are reached, they are likely to be exceeded suddenly and without warning. I saw a video of a European road race of some sort. These cars have stiff anti roll bars and as they dart around corners they exhibit no body roll. In this video as a car came through a turn it exceeded it's limits and rolled so fast it looked like a Hollywood stunt where they roll a car by firing a hydrogen peroxide rocket (no visible exhaust) attached under the edge of the car. It was sudden and without warning.

Sway bars are like any other mods. There are always trade offs. Rock crawlers aren't going to want them. High speed racers will. I'm interested in a smooth riding vehicle that is a good all around performer on a rocky trail or on a trail that allows a little high speed fun (not racing). I'm thinking relatively soft bars front and back are what I will like.

The rear bar only factory set up is very curious. Most cars come with them only in front. Maybe Kawaski was trying to save money or was just worried about compensating when the rear was loaded with 500 lbs. IMHO I think it would be better to have two soft bars on all four suspensions with good compliance, than no bar in front (good compliance) but a badly stiff rear suspension. Doesn't seem balanced, and instinctively, I think things should be balanced.

Someone else can perhaps explain why.
 

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The stocker is a tube not solid. My assumption is they wanted your vehicle to be steady with a load like 500lbs in the bed.

With the right torsion bar front and rear you can run circles around a stock vehicle literally.

You are right about the tip over point, when it goes it goes but you have a lot less two wheeling before you get to that point.
 

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Just got done installing ITI front and rear sway bars on my '09 Teryx. IMHO, the standard bars they supply are extremely stiff, intended for racing on very smooth surfaces and for people who intend to jump their vehicles. They are excessive for hunters or ranchers that simply want to make moderately good speed over poor quality trails or roads. I tested my Teryx up a steep loose rough road and these stiff bars did a poor job of keeping the tires in contact with the surface, resulting in a loss of traction. The suspension articulation is almost non existent (more on this later).

Frank at ITI has been very helpful and will be sending me a bar for the rear that is about 1/2 the value of the original bar's torsional resistance, and a bar for the front that is about 1/4 the original bar's value. This is a good example of why you don't want to buy something like this from E-Bay or some discount vendor who can't support your purchase.

The original ITI kit bars had the same value for front and rear. IMHO, the front should be 1/2 the value of the rear because the bar arms are shorter on the front, giving the suspension less leverage on the bar, and because there is less weight on the front for the bar to control. I did some math on this but we'll see how good the math is when I get the bars and test them.

The different in articulation of the suspension with a original very stiff ITI sway bar is quite dramatic. With the original bar in place, I jacked up one front tire until the other front tire left the ground. The spring on the jacked up tire compressed only about 1/8"!. With the bar detached, the spring on the jacked up tire compressed 2"! Interestingly, with the bar attached, the first tire to lift was the opposite front. With the bar detached, the first tire to lift was the same side rear.

Repeating this test on the rear with the original ITI sway bar yielded spring compression of only 1/4". Clearly there is a lot of middle ground for someone desiring some sway control yet also desiring some independent articulation of the suspension. Fortunately, Frank at ITI can offer a wide range of sway bar values.

According to my calculations, with my new bars I am expecting about 3/4 inch spring compression front and rear, testing as described above. We'll see ...

By the way, all this assumes an empty vehicle. I'm dialing it in for the majority of my use which will be driver only. Add a passenger and 500 pounds of gear, and you're increasing the vehicle weight by 1,000 pounds, or about 70%. The bars I'm ordering may be too light for this. But the bars aren't that expensive and are easy to swap out so I can see having more than one set for more than one kind of use.

A word of caution: Check your suspension travel carefully. You may find the front sway struts get close to hitting 2.5 inch diameter springs used with 2 inch after market shocks. You will need a shock that allows the shock body to be mounted to the lower a arm or you won't be able to add the front ITI bar.

You may also find the tops of the struts hit the headlamp housings and you might ask Frank for shorter sway bar struts or shorten the one supplied (will have to deepen the threaded holes in the ends with taps). I shortened my struts to 8". Check the length of the struts you get in case ITI makes any changes in the parts they supply.

Keep an eye on the tie rod end on the driver's side because as the suspension compresses the tie rod end passes close by the end of the bolt going through the lower end of the shock. You can add the 1/4 inch spacer provided by ITI, and perhaps a washer, to space out the bottom of the strut to get clearance for the strut from the shock bottom and coil spring, but on the driver's side, you can't space it out much more. The attached picture shows the driver side and it looks scary, but as that tie rod end moves up it also moves to the right and just scoots by. I ground a small relief on part of the bolt head.

I also found it necessary to add a 1/4" spacer and a longer bolt to the top of each strut (these parts were not part of the original kit), to help them to clear the coil springs through full cycling of the suspension (1). You can't add much bigger spacers here either or the top of the strut gets into the headlight housing under full suspension compression.

I was able to get the front sway bar to just clear everything when combined with Bilsteins from Microtouch, 250 lb front springs, 325 lb rear springs. The Bilsteins can be mounted in any position. Happily, putting the shock body down in front not only made the ITI front bar possible, but it makes it easier to get at the lock rings with the tires on. The reason I mentioned the spring values is that at these values and at a stock ride height the front springs are compressed enough to keep them out of the way of the sway bar struts.

In the rear, the best deal is shock body up, or the lock rings will be very difficult to access with the tires on. There are no clearance issues regarding the rear ITI bar except that I had to shorten the lever arms a little as their tips were just hitting the rear upper control arms. Again, check stuff before altering it should ITI make any changes in what they supply.

Hey Crowdog! I don't see a spring in the picture you posted? What kind of shock do you have? Air shocks? It certainly makes adding the ITI bar easier. Can you adjust suspension height like you can with the coil springs?

(1) To fully cycle the suspension, remove the coil spring, then you can use a jack to easily force the suspension all the way to the top. You can put the lock rings back on the shock body to mark the point where you think the struts are likely to hit the spring. There is no substitute for fully cycling the suspension as the various parts involved move in complicated ways that are hard to predict. There can be interference where you think there won't, and there may not be interference where you think there may.
 

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Very well written. i am curious to see how these work for you, and when iti has a good database for different set-ups. I am a firm believer in these type of bars as i work on a late model stock car and that is what we use also. The only thing is we have about 10 different pound ratings for the different tracks and set-ups we use, so we have a whole rack of different bars!!
 
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