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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone experienced problems with the fan Relay on an 09 Teryx?
Its located under the driver seat, second one in from the outside.
It quit working causing my teryx to overheat. I was able to get it working again but don't trust it.
 

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You can replace it with a new one, upgrade it with a better one with similar load rating, or you can even wire a switch and overide it...
 

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I just put a 15 amp fuseable link in its place. I didnt trust mine after it caused my teryx to overheat.
The purpose of a fusible link is different than that of a relay. Relays have a proven history of reliability when used properly. You might want to consider just replacing the original relay with a new higher quality one. I may be wrong, but it seems with a fusible link, the circuit will be always closed, with your fan running continuously. You're taking the switch out of the equation entirely. Generally speaking, you only want that fan to run when it's needed. The fan motor will last longer, it'll put less of a drain on your electrical system, and you won't overcool in cold climate situations. If you didn't eliminate the fan switch, then you may be running the full electrical draw from the fan motor through the switch. It may not be designed to handle the load, especially when that fan first kicks on.
There's another thing naggin' at the back of my brain. I can't quite recall what it's was, but I remember my A&P instructor (years ago) saying something about never having two circuit protection devices inline. I wish I could recall what issues would arise, maybe someone reading could chime in?
 

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My fan relay gave me problems also. I put a in-line water proof buse type fuse and have had no problems at this time. I was at a big atv event when mine went out and there were 10 or 15 other teryx owners there. When I check with 2 of the other teryx owners there they said that they had the same issue and they both had installed a in-line type buse fuse. Bluefly makes me think that this may not be good but dont know for sure for now. Chime in and let me know what you think of this in-line fuse. When all of this happened to me last year I just loaded my teryx up and went home. I installed the fuse and my fan still would not come on and later found out that the fan motor was bad, therefore I dont really know if it was my relay but still left the in-line fuse set up in. Kawasaki replaced my fan motor and I showed them my in-line fuse set up and he did not say anything like that I should not use the in-line fuse. He had no comment at all as to if I should or should not put it in therefore I have left it in and have not had any isssues YET.
 

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Maybe I'm wrong, but are you guys referring to the "circuit breaker" under the seat NOT a relay???? A relay and a circuit breaker are two different animals.

The issue with the circuit breaker is the amp rating. If you get any sort of mud or load on the fan motor it will trip the breaker and you need to pull the seat up to reset it. All you need to do is go buy a 15A circuit breaker (same thing as a 15A in-line fuse, but you don't have to carry around fuses). I believe the stock circuit breaker is 10A.

Bluefly - the biggest issue with multiple in-line fuses/breakers is your not adding any additional protection, only another level of troubleshooting if the circuit opens. Typically a circuit breaker is used across a "circuit" and has a higher amperage trip point and a fuse is a componet overload protection for current draw on the circuit. So you could have a 15A circuit breaker and multiple componets in the circuit that have say 2A fuses in-line to limit the current draw to that componet.
 
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