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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This the latest idea I came up with for hauling my Teryx.

Problem: rear tires sits on tailgate, scary thought, tailgate cables breaks or ends pull out!

Solution for GMC or Late model Chevy pickup.

There is a 3/8 hole located at the topside of the edge of the tailgate and it goes all the way through the tailgate! So I ran a 3/8, 8/18 stainless rod through the tailgate and machined some ends to thread on to both sides of the rod. (3/8 -24 NF) thread. Then I fabricate 2 channels to extend down inside the holes in the rear stake bed 2 holes, with a piece of 3/8 1 1/2 steel strap on the welded top. The channel was then secured with a 1/2 13 grade 5 bolt from the side. I then ran a 5/8 steel rod from the rod ends to the strap at the top of the strap and secured the rod with grade 8 cap screws. Anyway check out the pictures, it is much easier than trying to explain .......

I am still a bit worried about hitting a bump and sheering the stainless:eek::eek:

PS I built this system all from shop junk:D:D:D
 

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CommanderTalk.com
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Looks like a pretty secure way of transporting your Teryx for those without a trailer. I imagine the wheel wheels need to be driven over due to the width. Good work though!

This reminds me...a few weeks ago, my buddy put his Rhino in the back of his long bed F250. Being in a hurry, he failed to strap the ramps to the truck and guess what...ramps decided they no longer wanted to be on the tailgate and that Rhino came slamming down onto the tailgate. Seeing as he was determined to get the Rhino in the back, he once again places the ramps onto what is now a slightly bent tailgate. He makes it up this time.

Long story short, he is able to make it for the ride and once we were done and loading up...he proceeded to drop the Rhino off the tailgate two more times.

The reason I bring this up...always remember to strap those ramps to the truck, not matter how quickly you want to get out riding.
 

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Hey that is a great idea. I brought my teryx home from the dealer in the bed of my chevy dually and it was not fun loading or unloading. I think it will ride in my toyhauler and a quad or two in the bed of the truck from now on.
 

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Looks like a pretty secure way of transporting your Teryx for those without a trailer. I imagine the wheel wheels need to be driven over due to the width. Good work though!

This reminds me...a few weeks ago, my buddy put his Rhino in the back of his long bed F250. Being in a hurry, he failed to strap the ramps to the truck and guess what...ramps decided they no longer wanted to be on the tailgate and that Rhino came slamming down onto the tailgate. Seeing as he was determined to get the Rhino in the back, he once again places the ramps onto what is now a slightly bent tailgate. He makes it up this time.

Long story short, he is able to make it for the ride and once we were done and loading up...he proceeded to drop the Rhino off the tailgate two more times.

The reason I bring this up...always remember to strap those ramps to the truck, not matter how quickly you want to get out riding.
I had my straps on, but not tight enough.

Also, make sure you are 4WD.
 

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That is a good point Crowdog, to get over those wheel wells you will likely have a lot more control while in 4wd.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Crowdog, I think you are going to be looking at allot of expense when your cables break or the ends come off!

The past 12 years I worked in the fitness equipment business. We made cables for weight machines both commercial and residential. I did a lot of research before I began making cables, due to the liablelity involved.

Most tailgate cables are a rubber coated 3/16 inch, probably galvanized cable. The breaking strength is 4250lbs. Sounds like strong enough, however the industry standard is breaking strength divided by 5 to get what is called "working weight". This means that each cable should support 850 lbs, But the problem is that cables don't usually fail by just breaking. A large percentage of the cables fail at the connector my simply pulling out of the end. Also the amount of stress put on the cable just sitting there is just fine! But every you hit a bump the stress is multiplied by the G factor of the bump. If you hit a bump hard it could be 5 to 10 G's. Your tailgate cables will not hold your load! I hope you will take some action to reinforce your tailgate before it gets expensive!:mad::mad::eek:
 

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All I have done in the past is build a steel frame which your front tires sit on and your rear tires sit on just above the tailgate. I have used 1" x 1" x 1/8" tubing and it was light enough to pullout when not in use yet strong enough to hold the weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
All I have done in the past is build a steel frame which your front tires sit on and your rear tires sit on just above the tailgate. I have used 1" x 1" x 1/8" tubing and it was light enough to pullout when not in use yet strong enough to hold the weight.
Great idea also!:):)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That is a good point Crowdog, to get over those wheel wells you will likely have a lot more control while in 4wd.
After punching out my window on my 2000 ranger with my wife's 700 Prairie, I am just a bit twitchy when it comes to loading and unloading! Defiantly use 4Wheel drive in low range while loading!:eek::eek:
 

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We have now hauled mine in my dually a few times. It beats pulling a trailer but I think when we are camping it will go in the hauler and 2 quads in the bed of the truck.
 

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I took flat stock, heated it and made a U bend to fit into the stock tailgate lock. Welded it to a flat piece run down to stock tailgate that fit over the tailgate stub. Works great and removable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I took flat stock, heated it and made a U bend to fit into the stock tailgate lock. Welded it to a flat piece run down to stock tailgate that fit over the tailgate stub. Works great and removable.
Have you got any picture of that?
 

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Crowdog, I think you are going to be looking at allot of expense when your cables break or the ends come off!

The past 12 years I worked in the fitness equipment business. We made cables for weight machines both commercial and residential. I did a lot of research before I began making cables, due to the liablelity involved.

Most tailgate cables are a rubber coated 3/16 inch, probably galvanized cable. The breaking strength is 4250lbs. Sounds like strong enough, however the industry standard is breaking strength divided by 5 to get what is called "working weight". This means that each cable should support 850 lbs, But the problem is that cables don't usually fail by just breaking. A large percentage of the cables fail at the connector my simply pulling out of the end. Also the amount of stress put on the cable just sitting there is just fine! But every you hit a bump the stress is multiplied by the G factor of the bump. If you hit a bump hard it could be 5 to 10 G's. Your tailgate cables will not hold your load! I hope you will take some action to reinforce your tailgate before it gets expensive!:mad::mad::eek:
If I was going to do it anymore, I would reinforce the tailgate. But I will probably just use my open trailer instead.

 

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Thats a nice setup for day trips. I like how the trailer floor sits above the tires and wheels. We have talked that if we keep our current toyhauler I might put a flat bed on the duallly so if and when I lt the teryx it will fit.
 

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Instead of reinforcing your tailgate, just keep the weight off of it by putting blocks about 3/4 the way back. That way the weight will be in the bed of your short bed truck and not on the tailgate.
 

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instead of doing all of that just back it on a friend of mine said his tailgate wouldnt break or anything. and a few weeks later it wouldnt shut. then he got a new one for his truck and backed it in and his tailgate closes evry time:D
 

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I tested a great product called the ATV Riser by TRIWORKS INDUSTRIES, it allows for the save hauling of an ATV in a short box pick-up. They also make a UTV riser, which when combined with their riser extensions will allow removal of the tailgate. I'm going to pick up the UTV version for use with my Dodge Ram 3500 short box.

 
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